LU Jazz Rep & Nicole Henry on April 16th at 8pm

Nicole Henry

“There’s plenty for jazz and funk fans to savor here, and Warfield’s Hell’s Kitchen Funk Orchestra delivers a tasty meal for the ears.”
~Bill Milkowski, contributor to Down Beat & Jazziz

“Vocalist Nicole Henry pleasingly brings together a range of styles—smooth and mainstream jazz, along with pop and gospel.”
~ All About Jazz

Lehigh University Music Department presents its annual spring jazz performance with Bill Warfield and the Hell’s Kitchen Funk Orchestra featuring vocalist Nicole Henry with Lehigh University Jazz Repertory Orchestra on April 16 at 8pm in Baker Hall. Tickets are $15; general admission. WDIY is the Lehigh University Music Department media sponsor.

Nicole long Badgley Mischka dress 2015 - by Rafael BalcazarSM 1Nicole Henry has established herself as one of the jazz world’s most acclaimed vocalists, possessing a potent combination of dynamic vocal abilities, impeccable phrasing, and powerful emotional resonance. Her passionate, soulful voice and heart-felt charisma has earned her a 2013 Soul Train Award for “Best Traditional Jazz Performance,” three Top-10 U.S. Billboard and HMV Japan jazz albums. Heralded by The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Japan Times, El Pais, Jazz Times, Essence and more, Henry tells real stories through repertoire from the American Songbook, classic and contemporary jazz, contemporary standards, blues and originals.

She has captivated audiences in over 15 countries, headlining at venues in cities including New York, Tokyo, Madrid, Moscow, Paris, Shanghai, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, San Francisco and Miami. Ms. Henry has also performed in more than 30 music festivals worldwide and in some of the world’s most famous venues including Blue Note, NYC; Jazz at Lincoln Center; Blues Alley; Arsht Center; Feinstein’s; Green Mill; Madrid Jazz Festival; the Regattabar; and Catalina Jazz.

Bill playingBill Warfield, since his 1988 opus, the New York City Jazz, trumpeter-composer-arranger has been widely known as a dyed-in-the-wool big band guy culminating in last year’s Trumpet Story, with special guest Randy Brecker. This time out, Warfield had something completely different in mind. As he explained, “The original idea was to do a mid ‘60s Miles kind of thing, and as I got more into it and started thinking about it, my roots are really in rhythm ‘n’ blues. All the bands I played in growing up in Baltimore were Motown bands and funk bands and Atlantic Starr kinds of bands. Baltimore is like the Oakland of the East Coast in that regard. That funky side of things is well represented on this project dubbed ‘The Hell’s Kitchen Funk Orchestra’ by their intrepid leader, who resides in the Hell’s Kitchen section of Manhattan. But to call it just a funk band is far too limiting for this remarkably versatile outfit. Indeed, few other bands have the wherewithal to go from Joe Zawinul to Tito Puente, Fats Waller, Eddie Harris and Snarky Puppy in a single record.

Warfield has released nine previous albums leading his own ensembles and has appeared in the horn sections of numerous other albums, including two by the acclaimed Bill Kirchner Nonet. Over the years he has performed with such artists as Ornette Coleman, Mel Torme, Mel Lewis, David Liebman and Sonny Stitt. He received a commission from the Spanish government to arrange and produce “Hollywood Jazz” for the 1992 Olympics in that country, and has also been commissioned by the Berlin Radio Orchestra and the US Air Force “Airmen Of Note.” In addition, Warfield is the founder and director of the New York Jazz Repertory Orchestra as well as its offshoot, the New York Jazz Octet, and also the Lehigh Valley Jazz Repertory Orchestra.

Tickets for April 16 are $15; free for Lehigh students.  For more information, call 610-758-2787, ext. 0 or visit Zoellner Ticket Services, Tuesday 12-6 pm, Wednesday – Friday from 125 pm, two hours before curtain, or online at www.zoellnerartscenter.org.  Senior, student, group and LVAIC discounts are available.

Art & Food

How do you like to get excited about going to a show? Do you think about what to wear? What about dinner or drink plans before or after? For our season opener last week, Silagh White (Director of Arts Engagement and Community Cultural Affairs) shared how she got ready to fully enjoy Sheila E. Read here how she tapped into local retailers and a smart Lehigh Alum food blogger.

Michelle

Michelle Rittler – Taste As You Go Food Blogger, Lehigh University, ’02

Or if you don’t want to read that post, here’s what you should know. Lehigh alum, Michelle Rittler (’02) is a successful food blogger who has done her research on the Zoellner Guest Artist season to share great food/cocktail pairings for the shows. She’s come up with inspiring recipes that are kitchen tested and presented with techniques beautifully photographed for the experienced and novice cook.

We are hoping to share her ideas with you, and encourage you to sign up for Michelle’s newsletter, right on the top of her blog. Here are Michelle’s ideas for this weekend:

Potato Gratin

Potato Gratin

 

Friday night – Morgan James.
Potato Gratin. Recipe here.
WHY? Morgan James is from Idaho!

Local dining alternative: Try the tater tots at Molly’s. Always crispy, always delicious. They also have a “loaded” version of tater tots worth experimenting.

 

18-Melon-Ball-Cocktails-tasteasyougo.com

Melon Ball Cocktails

Saturday night – Bill Warfield & the Hell’s Kitchen Funk Orchestra; Mercy, Mercy, Mercy
Melon Ball Cocktails. Recipe here.
WHY? Hard bop has its origins in the 1950s. This was a popular cocktail during this time.

Local dining alternative. Try any of these five establishments highlighted by another Lehigh Valley blogger (Cheryl Doll) on her “5 Best Cocktail Bars in Bethlehem” list. Two on the list are within walking distance of Zoellner Arts Center (hint: Social Still and Bookstore Speakeasy), We also suggest trying Molinari’s: tell them Zoellner sent you!

 

Sunday afternoon – Faculty Recital: Paul Salerni – Music from Three Continents
Rugelach (a popular Jewish dessert) – Sign up for Michelle’s newsletter to get the recipe
WHY? The program includes works by Israeli-American composer Ofer Ben-Amots. And this concert is in between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. (Happy Sweet New Year)

Local dining alternative: Head to Molinari’s for some great Italian dining. Paul Salerni proudly celebrates his Italian heritage.

Bill Warfield and the International Core-tet

Core-tetBill Warfield and the International Core­-tet
The International Core-tet is a group of jazz artists that have come together to facilitate and explore the bond that exists between musicians from many different countries. The group is made up of trumpeter Bill Warfield and saxophonist Glenn Cashman from the U.S., saxophonist Jens “Chappe” Jensen from Denmark and from the Czech Republic, guitarist Libor Smoldas and keyboardist Jakub Zomer. Bill and Jakub met each other in the summer of 2012, while they were working together in Graz, Austria. An invitation by Jakub led Bill to Prague a few weeks later where he met Libor Smoldas. The three worked together for a week and found a real “magic” in the music they played. Between gigs and sets they discussed the idea of forming a core group to continue the transcendent experience they had that week. They made plans to travel together, bringing their mutual love of the music to other countries, including musicians from wherever they went to complete the group. Bill and Jens “Chappe” Jensen met when international saxophone icon Dave Liebman performed a show in Arhus, Denmark, entitled “Le Jazz Hot”, composed, arranged and conducted by Bill. Chappe had arranged Lieb’s appearance.While rehearsing the Kluver’s Jazz Orchestra of which “Chappe” was a member, Bill and he made plans for Bill’s to return following year to compose and conduct a show specifically written for the Danish group.

That was the beginning of their collaborations.
With the inclusion of Jens, the group now represented three European countries and will be performing as the Coretet in the US in the winter of 2015. Joining them for that tour will be three mainstays of the New York Jazz scene: tenor saxophonist Glenn Cashman, bassist Steve Count and percussionist Scott Neumann. Their first recording will be on the Planet ArtsNetwork at the end of the winter tour. The group will continue touring in Europe in the spring and summer 2015.

The International Core-tet performs compositions born of the genres of funk, contemporary and Latin Jazz while embracing the varied
backgrounds and experiences of its members. Audiences are treated to high-powered contemporary music that communicates, transcends and
inspires. We are excited to be embarking on this journey and hope that you will join us in the coming year and to many unspecified dates in the
future.

Bill Warfield and the International Core-tet will perform at the Zoellner Arts Center this Saturday at 8:00 PM. Click here for tickets.

Top arts@Lehigh stories of 2014

blog image 2014 year in review
An email I received Monday inspired this post. I was asked to share the top three arts stories at Lehigh University.
Instead of picking the top three arts@Lehigh stories of 2014, I picked the top three stories in categories that represent how I think about the arts when I look around campus: guest artists, arts news, student production, faculty research, and campus arts integration.
Guest Artists – top three:
3. Smokey Robinson at the 2014 Zoellner Arts Center Gala. Mr. Robinson was generous, and in great voice.
2. Nas and Angela Davis for the MLK keynote. Yeah, that was kinda huge, even if Nas wasn’t a “Zoellner” guest artists in the sense that he wasn’t performing. Thanks to Dr. James Peterson for bringing him to Lehigh. There’s nothing like celebrity status to start social justice discussions.
1. Darlene Love – Zoellner’s Artistic Director Deborah Sacarakis really nailed the timing of Darlene Love’s show in Bethlehem the day after her final Late Night with David Letterman performance.
Top three News Stories:
3. Zoellner Administrative Director Andy Cassano led the PA Presenters conference in May 2014. We are fortunate to have a visionary leader not only for our campus arts center, but for Pennsylvania.
2. Deborah Sacarakis was honored by the Lehigh Valley Dance Consortium with the Distinguished Service Award. (April 6, 2014)
1. Andy Cassano responds to Bethlehem City Council/Mayor proposal to raise the Amusement Tax in an op-ed piece to the Morning Call.
Student Production
3. Mustard & Cheese Reefer Madness. The writer, Dan Studney came to the show on Dec 6th !
2. Marching 97 at Yankee Stadium
1. Lisa Glover – Kit Rex
Faculty Research (items picked with performance dates in mind)
3. Erica Hoelsher – Costumes and mask design for the Idiopathic Ridiculopathy Consortium’s production of Eugéne Ionesco’s Rhinoceros
2. Bill Warfield’s CD Release Party at Iridium
1. Steven Sametz with LU Choral Arts at Carnegie Hall
Campus Arts Integration
3. Increasing community school outreach. McKinley Elementary School second graders tour the campus after lunch in Rathbone Dining Hall and seeing Lightwire Theater at Zoellner. That campus engagement led to a week long residency in July with local artist, Doug Royston. In October, the entire Broughal Middle School saw Cirque Alfonse. The PBS39 covered that story here:
Both of these opportunities were the results of campus support; financial support from College of Education and College of Arts & Sciences, staff volunteer campus tour guides, and generous expertise from local artist, Doug Royston and the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley.
2. TIE Mercy Killers & Shostakovich 7th. Mercy Killers is a heart wrenching look at the consequences of America’s health care system. The one-man play was written and performed by Michael Milligan. Experts from Lehigh faculty and administration were on hand to provide reflection and discussion after each show. Story by student Madison Gouveia in Lehigh’s Brown and White. The Lehigh University Philharmonic took an extensive semester long study of Dmitri Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7 which was written during the 1943-1944 siege of Leningrad. Books, films and a presentation by Lehigh University Russian language and literature professor Mary Nicholas gave the musicians a deeper understanding of the piece and its relevance to current Russian culture and politics.
1. Hammerschlag Design series. Envisioned by two faculty, Anthony Viscardi and Nick Nikolov, these experience fully embraced the creative potential of the Mountaintop Learning Environment.

Music Professor Bill Warfield’s Jazz Album Getting Stellar Reviews

Trumpet StoryAn associate professor of music and director of jazz studies at Lehigh University has a new album out that’s been getting great reviews. Bill Warfield’s “Trumpet Story” was released last July and has been doing very well in the Jazz album charts. You can hear a few tracks on his Reverb Nation profile here.

Or, if you want to listen to the album live, you could hear the CD release party at the Iridium in New York City on September 24, at 8PM. Randy Brecker will be joining the group for this event. Or, if you can’t wait to hear Bill perform, he will be performing with the New York Jazz Octet at the Deer Head Inn in Delaware Water Gap, PA this Saturday August 30th at 7:30pm. Come to think of it, that sounds like a lovely holiday weekend get away.

In the music business, reviews are highly valued. We appreciate all of the journalists who support jazz music. For an academic musician who composes, performs and records, music reviews are the peer view journal of their research. Consider this post a celebration of Lehigh University Jazz Professor Bill Warfield’s artistic, musical and academic success. (All of the reviews below are linked to the original source for reference.)

So what are the Jazz Critics saying? Here’s a list:

Buffalo News – Jeff Simon
Because Randy Brecker is dealing with the orchestra of his friend, arranger and trumpet player Bill Warfield (a jazz academic from Lehigh University), there is a good deal of variation in sonority, from the brass richness of Warfield’s version of Herbie Hancock’s “Speak Like a Child” to the dark, brooding muted textures and Stravinskyish carnival dancing of Warfield’s “In the Land of Chad and Barbie,” the disc is never uninteresting for very long. It gives Randy Brecker opportunities to do some of his most interesting playing on disc in quite a while. Other soloists besides Brecker include guitarist Vic Jurist, always a pleasure in any context.

Midwest Record – Chris Spector
PLANET ARTS- BILL WARFIELD BIG BAND featuring Randy Brecker/Trumpet Story: A boomer that grew up on all the same stuff as the rest of us but knows how to play a mean trumpet decides to pay musical tribute to all the trumpet players that inspired him. Once again we find that arts council music is no longer sounding like arts council music. A swinging date loaded with originals that hit the mark, Warfield even brings in Randy Brecker to blow a few notes, and he’s one of the cats Warfield is paying tribute to. Edgy big band stuff, it’s high water mark sitting down jazz that’s an unabashed roller coaster ride for your ears. You can feel all the care that went into all facets of the execution from concept to finish and listening to this kind of detail is a real treat. Check it out.

Straight No Chaser (blogcritics.org)
With his participation in the Bill Warfield Big Band’s Trumpet Story, the legendary trumpeter Randy Brecker continues a series of fine guest recordings with large ensembles. Since his Grammy winning Randy in Brasil CD in 2008, he has continually made recordings with ensembles as varied as the Danish Radio Big Band and The Danish National Chamber Orchestra (The Jazz Ballad Book); the Kalisz Philharmonic Orchestra (Night in Calisia, also a Grammy winner); and Chuck Owen’s Big Band Jazz Surge (The Comet’s Tail – Performing the Compositions of Michael Brecker).

Brecker’s 
playing 
has 
been 
a 
major 
influence
 on 
the 
work 
of 
fellow 
trumpeter/composer
 Bill
 Warfield.

Brecker 
first 
collaborated
 with 
Warfield
 on 
a 
Sketches
 of
 Spain
 concert
 at 
Lehigh 
University, 
where
 Warfield is an Associate Professor of Music and directs the jazz studies program. Since then, whenever Warfield considered working on a large scale tribute to his favorite trumpet players, he always heard Brecker in his head.

The project, a four-part suite, morphed into Trumpet Story, a Big Band recording of four Warfield pieces, a Brecker tune (“Sponge”) and arrangements of songs that influenced Warfield over the years, including “Speak Like a Child” and “Pharoah’s Dance”. Brecker shines throughout, especially on Warfield’s funky “When Janie Takes the Stand.” As always, Brecker can play with the bombast needed for a a Big Band soloist, yet with the undeniable lyricism that has made his versions of Brazilian tunes so plaintive and seductive. For me, the highlights come on the soloing on “Sponge”, as Brecker lays it down, and Mark Phaneuf’s tenor sax and Sam Burtis’ trombone answer the challenge.

Music Review: The Bill Warfield Big Band Featuring Randy Brecker – ‘Trumpet Story’ (by Jack Goodstein)
Review Overview Summary :Randy Brecker and Bill Warfield make a combination that’s hard to beat.

As Neil Tesser’s liner notes explain, the original idea behind Trumpet Story – the new album from The Bill Warfield Big Band – was to celebrate the trumpet by “writing a suite of big-band compositions for trumpet soloist” focusing on the contributions of icons of the instrument. Warfield, a fine trumpeter in his own right, decided that rather than taking the lead himself he would write for a different trumpeter, one he had worked with before and whose talents were legend: Randy Brecker.

While originally a four-movement suite, the current album grew into something a bit different, celebrating not only the trumpet but a whole range of Warfield’s musical influences. Three of the suite’s original sections are retained, and a selection of compositions by some of these other influences arranged by Warfield fills out the disc. While the focus is still on the trumpet, the current arrangements try to set the instrument in a broader musical context.

The album opens with the funky “When Janie Takes the Stand,” an edgy piece that resurfaces again to close the set in an (edited) airplay track. Brecker’s solo work is complemented by solos from Vic Juris on guitar and Tim Sessions on trombone. Herbie Hancock’s “Speak Like a Child,” a splendidly lyrical piece which appropriately features pianist Mike Eckroth, follows. The piano, now played by Art Hirahara, introduces Warfield’s beautiful “A Window That Shows Me the Moon.”

“Theme for Malcolm” is a Donald Brown composition with some sweet solo work from Brecker and Mike Migliore on the alto sax. Warfield himself does the solo work on Philip Sparke’s “Flowerdale,” a mood ballad with some majestic passages. Brecker’s “Sponge” gives some idea of the trumpeter’s compositional skills. Two more pieces by Warfield, “Carol,” written for his wife, and the haunting “In the Land of Chad and Barbie,” plus a 16-minute take on Joe Zawinul’s “Pharaoh’s Dance” round out the album. Trumpet Story is big band music at its finest. Randy Brecker and Bill Warfield make a combination that’s hard to beat.

The Bill Warfield Big Band Featuring Randy Brecker Trumpet Story PAN 2014 by Brent Black
The Bill Warfield Big Band takes a look at the great Randy Brecker and is a triumph!

Actually…Trumpet Story goes slightly back to the future paying homage to other inspirations including Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinful, Donald Byrd and of course Randy Brecker. The achilles heel of big band is the automatic assumption of predictable. Trumpet Story moves past the accepted norm with variety ranging from a brilliant arrangement of Hancock’s “Speak Like A Child” to the slightly more unexpected conceptual nature of the original performance suite which was to be geared around Brecker’s ability to become that elusive harmonic chameleon as style would dictate.

Other notables include the incredibly overlooked pianist Art Hiahara on the Warfield original “A Window That Shows Me The Moon.” The deceptively subtle nuanced textures from which Brecker seems to favor take what might otherwise be a better than average big band release and elevate this collective to that special place long missing from the much maligned genre. Bill Warfield’s compositions and arrangements highlight that at times there is little doubt simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

The 
”Trumpet 
Story” 
Story
With his participation in the Bill Warfield Big Band’s Trumpet Story, the legendary trumpeter Randy Brecker continues a series of fine guest recordings with large ensembles. Since his Grammy winning Randy in Brasil CD in 2008, he has continually made recordings with ensembles as varied as the Danish Radio Big Band and The Danish National Chamber Orchestra (The Jazz Ballad Book); the Kalisz Philharmonic Orchestra (Night in Calisia, also a Grammy winner); and Chuck Owen’s Big Band Jazz Surge (The Comet’s Tail – Performing the Compositions of Michael Brecker).  

Brecker’s playing has been a major influence on the work of fellow trumpeter/composer Bill Warfield. Brecker first collaborated with Warfield on a Sketches of Spain concert at Lehigh University, where Warfield is an Associate Professor of Music and directs the jazz studies program. Since then, whenever Warfield considered working on a large scale tribute to his favorite trumpet players, he always heard Brecker in his head.

The project, a four-part suite, morphed into Trumpet Story, a Big Band recording of four Warfield pieces, a Brecker tune (“Sponge”) and arrangements of songs that influenced Warfield over the years, including “Speak Like a Child” and “Pharoah’s Dance.” Brecker shines throughout, especially on Warfield’s funky “When Janie Takes the Stand.” As always, Brecker can play with the bombast needed for a a Big Band soloist, yet with the undeniable lyricism that has made his versions of Brazilian tunes so plaintive and seductive.  For me, the highlights come on the soloing on “Sponge”, as Brecker lays it down, and Mark Phaneuf’s tenor sax and Sam Burtis’ trombone answer the challenge.

All
*About*
Jazz
 – Bill Warfield Big Band: Trumpet Story (2014) reviewed by Jack Bowers
Trumpeters Bill Warfield and Randy Brecker have been friends for twenty years; it’s high time they joined forces in a recording studio and began making beautiful music together. On Trumpet Story, Warfield’s big-band homage to trumpeters and other musicians who have influenced him through the years, six-time Grammy Award winner Brecker solos on eight of ten numbers, several of which were written by Warfield with him in mind. The result is what Joe Listener might expect—uniformly high- caliber jazz tastefully articulated by Brecker’s all- purpose trumpet / flugelhorn and suitably amplified by Warfield’s A-list ensemble and perceptive charts.

This is not, as one might reasonably expect from its name, an anthology of jazz trumpet from New Orleans to the present day but rather an invariably contemporary enterprise with bows not only toward a number of eminent trumpeters but to such notable composers as Herbie Hancock, Donald Brown, Joe Zawinul and Philip Sparke. Warfield, who solos handsomely on Sparke’s easygoing “Flowerdale,” arranged every number and wrote four: “When Janie Takes the Stand,” “A Window That Shows Me the Moon,” “In the Land of Chad and Barbie” and the winsome ballad “Carol” (for his wife). Brecker, for his part, composed the squishy “Sponge.” A slightly abbreviated airplay version of “Janie” closes the album.

Besides Brecker, who is always in sync, the band’s able soloists include guitarist Vic Juris (“Jamie,” “Chad and Barbie,” Zawinul’s provocative “Pharaoh’s Dance”), trombonist Tim Sessions (“Jamie”), bass trombonist Sam Burtis (“Sponge”), pianists Mike Eckroth (Hancock’s “Speak Like a Child”) and Art Hirahara (“Window”), alto Mike Migliore (Brown’s charming “Theme for Malcolm”), tenors Mark Phaneuf (“Sponge,” “Chad and Barbie”) and Dave Riekenberg (“Carol”) and baritone Matt Hong (“Pharaoh’s Dance”). As every member of the ensemble is a seasoned pro whose unwavering focus is on the task at hand, there is no cause to single out or censure anyone.

In sum, a splendid enterprise from start to finish. If there is a downside, it may be that Warfield now and again leans a tad too heavily on rock beats (“Jamie,” “Sponge,” “Pharaoh’s Dance”) but that is purely a matter of personal taste, certainly nothing to give rise to any equivocation or concern.

Brecker, Warfield offer a brassy ‘Trumpet Story’ By The Tribune-Review Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014 by Bob Karlovits
Trumpeter Randy Brecker is indeed the story behind this album. It has been a busy year for the brass star, and he continues it on the Bill Warfield Big Band’s “Trumpet Story.” Being the guest on a number of recent albums, Brecker provides a top-notch voice to the band and its offerings. The tunes include Warfield originals, Brecker’s “Sponge,” Herbie Hancock’s “Speak Like a Child,” Joe Zawinul’s “Pharoah’s Dance” and even “Flowerdale” from British brass-band specialist Phillip Sparke. Although the band is of traditional size and instrumentation, Warfield’s arrangements give it a brassier sound that fits in well around Brecker’s powerful trumpet voice. The other part of this story is Warfield’s own work on the trumpet. He takes the lead on the Sparke piece and gives it power and precision. His arrangement also is an excellent big-band version of that brass-band composition.

YouTube about to change drastically – things you should know

Independent career networking and promotion in the arts via YouTube is going to be changing drastically. Soon. Announced just days ago,

youtube-logo2“YouTube is preparing to radically change the site, adding a subscription service that is intended to help them compete in the streaming music industry. The Google-owned video site has already signed new licensing deals with all of the major labels, but many independents are refusing to take part.” (read more in the Forbes article by Hugh Macintire) and the subsequent post by Ellen Huet (keep sculling under the first article) in which she describes more directly what is happening:

“YouTube is launching a paid subscription streaming music service to compete with Spotify and Pandora later this summer. It will be integrated with the free, ad-supported YouTube users are used to, but with added features available to paying subscribers.”

As an arts administrator, I use YouTube daily for research and for audience development. I’m not exactly sure how this change will impact the tools for the trade. I use YouTube videos to help people get a sense for artists they’ve never heard of; musicians, dancers, spoken word, speeches. I link to videos frequently for relevant content on social media sites. Curating art content would be a huge hit if the independent artists I support are going to have new limits on how we get to know them in a virtual world. I’m wondering what local musicians are thinking.

Before any conversation though, I’m now looking up artists like Dina Hall, Not for Coltrane, Dave Fry (this is not his channel, but a really cool TEDx Talk he gave worth a listen)*, Philadelphia Funk Authority *, Jon Fadem, Large Flowerheads, Dave Doll (And his band Beautiful Distortion), Alisa B Anderson, …

Paul Salerni, Bill Warfield, Steven Sametz, Eugene Albulescu, Michael Jorgensen, and the list can go on to include all the performance faculty, composition students current and alumni…. or even precious videos of Lehigh University’s ensembles.

After that brief research exercise, I found some names listed above have their own channels, others were tagged so that I could easily find videos in which they appear. By golly, if the capacity to gather these sounds in order for their artistry to speak for itself is limited – we’re all going to have to rethink how we touch the music. How will this change our habits, our constant need to have everything available through the keystrokes of our devices? Might we actually see more live music and … PAY FOR IT?!?!?

Some reflection in view of my vinyl record collection is required. Maybe I’ll up my biannual contribution to public radio. Thoughts are running by so furiously – I’m not sure where to end this post. Maybe I’ll just stop typing and turn on some music I actually paid for.

[any and all thoughts and conversation welcome here or in person if you see me at the next Farmer’s Market in Campus Square, before a show at Godfrey Daniels, hanging around the Sun Inn Court Yard, the City Hall Sculpture Garden, Levitt Pavillion at Steelstacks or in the Zoellner lobby] Trust me – this issue is just as compelling as Net Neutrality.

Maybe John Oliver will do an episode on this, too.

* internet searching always gives me a few distractions that lead down unexpected rabbit holes. But they also trigger other ideas and connections. Like, the TEDxTalk I’m dreaming about – and the fact that the Philly Funk Authority is playing in the Sculpture Garden 6-8pm on Friday.