Legendary Journalist Bill Moyers to Deliver Tresolini Lecture April 7 @ 8 PM

The multiple Emmy award-winning veteran journalist Bill Moyers has been selected as this year’s Tresolini Lecture speaker. Moyers’ talk, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 8 p.m.Tuesday, April 7, in Baker Hall of the Zoellner Arts Center. Metered street parking is available near the center, or for $4 in the attached garage.
Bill Moyers
The Rocco J. Tresolini Lectureship in Law was established in 1978, in memory of one of Lehigh’s most distinguished teachers and scholars, Rocco Tresolini (1920-1967), who served as professor and chair of the department of government. Moyers will be the latest in a long line of luminaries to deliver the Tresolini Lecture. These include former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, legendary investigative journalist Seymour Hersh, former Vietnam War-era strategic analyst Daniel Ellsberg, Presumed Innocent author Scott Turow, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, former Watergate-era White House Counsel John Dean, Bush v. Gore attorney David Boies, and Innocence Project founder Barry Scheck.

Tresolini Lecture co-organizer Richard Matthews, NEH Distinguished Professor and Chair of Political Science, said he can think of no social critic better qualified to discuss the current state of democracy in the United States.“Over the course of decades, Bill Moyers has been for the United States what Socrates was to Athens: a voice of reason challenging citizens to pursue a more just political community,” Matthews said.

Distinguished University Professor of Political Science Ted Morgan, who sought Moyers as a speaker, said that he frequently employs Moyers’ videos, and that they have been critically important in his teaching, particularly in his class on the relationship propaganda, Media and American Politics.”

“For a verylong time,” Morgan said, “Moyers has been about the only option for television viewers interested in getting important critical information and perspectives on the enormous problems we face as a society. His very presence has been a model of what our democratic society so desperately needs from its mass media.”

‘An essential voice in our national conversation’

A broadcast journalist for more than four decades, Moyers has been recognized as one of the unique voices of our times and one that resonates with multiple generations. He’s earned praise from many colleagues, including NBC newsman Brian Williams, who described him as not only an essential voice in our national conversation, but also “the living antithesis to an era of shocking superficiality in our discourse and media.”Moyers began his journalism career at age 16 as a cub reporter for his hometown daily newspaper in Marshall, Texas. He was a founding organizer and deputy director of the Peace Corps and special assistant to President Lyndon B. Johnson. He later served as Johnson’s press secretary from 1965 to 1967.As publisher of Newsday from 1967 to 1970,

Moyers is credited with bringing aboard extraordinary writers such as Pete Hamill and Saul Bellow, and led the paper to two Pulitzer Prizes. In 1976, he was the senior correspondent for the distinguished documentary series CBS Reports and later a senior news analyst for The CBS Evening News.With his wife and creative partner, Judith Davidson Moyers, Bill Moyers has produced such ground-breaking public affairs programs as NOW with Bill Moyers (from 2002 through 2005) and Bill Moyers Journal (from 2007 through 2010). Since the company’s founding in 1986, other notable productions have included the landmark 1988 series, Joseph Campbell and the Power of Myth; as well as Healing and the Mind; The Language of Life: A Festival of Poets; Genesis; On Our Own Terms: Moyers on Dying; Moyers on Addiction: Close to Home; America’s First River; and Becoming American: The Chinese Experience.

His latest media venture is Moyers & Company, which is available on air and online at BillMoyers.com. The program provides “conversations on democracy” and explorations of contemporary culture, with a focus on activism and social justice.

Moyers has received multiple awards for his body of work, including more than 30 Emmys, two prestigious Alfred I. Dupont-Columbia University Awards, nine Peabodys, and three George Polk Awards. In the first year it was bestowed, Moyers received the prestigious Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts by the American Film Institute. A Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he also received the Career Achievement Award from the International Documentary Association and has been honored by the Television Critics Association for outstanding career achievement.

Moyers was elected to the Television Hall of Fame in 1995. A year later, he received the Charles Frankel Prize (now the National Humanities Medal) from the National Endowment for the Humanities “for outstanding contributions to American cultural life.” In 2005, Moyers received the PEN USA Courageous Advocacy Award for his passionate, outspoken commitment to freedom of speech and his dedication to journalistic integrity. He has also been honored with the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences’ Lifetime Achievement Award.

Moyers’ books include such bestsellers as Listening to America; The Power of Myth; Healing and the MindThe Language of Life; Moyers on America: A Journalist and His Times; and Moyers on Democracy. His most recent book, Bill Moyers Journal: The Conversation Continues, was published in May 2011.

With more than 95,000 follows on Twitter, Moyers has taken advantage of the social media platforms to offer ongoing commentary on current events. Click here to follow Moyers on Twitter. Click here to see his Facebook page.

Experimenting for New Connections

arts@Lehigh has always been a program that supports the arts community on campus and in the South Bethlehem arts district. The arts@Lehigh mission began in 2005 with a provost initiative which supported artistic, creative and aesthetic innovation among students and faculty, as well as collaborations with the community. Financial support, advocacy and communications were the focus of the ArtsLehigh mission. While the funding for ArtsLehigh program ended, we continued to support the arts by advocating and facilitating arts integration on campus, and sharing information about upcoming events and opportunities for the campus and neighboring community. Hence, the subtle name change from ArtsLehigh to arts@Lehigh.

From the beginning, we have been experimenting with multiple communication platforms and sharing what we know with as broad a reach as possible and reasonable. Our weekly newsletter email is a brief curated list of events and activities that happen in the upcoming week. The newsletter is linked to many web-based resources; helping campus programs and local arts organizations share information and build their own communication circles. There are limitations to the newsletter. We are only permitted to send it to the college of arts & sciences email lists. But even with the limitation, we have good friends in the community who share the newsletter to their email lists.

With the limitations of reach, we also needed to put some boundaries on the content; sharing activities that happen on campus and within a walkable distance from campus. There are rare exceptions to this cap; usually faculty or student art work in locations beyond our imposed perimeter.

The blog began as a way to increase reach by providing a platform for more extensive information to be linked in the newsletter, and as a way to provide shareable information in between newsletter releases. We enhance Zoellner Arts Center press releases by adding links for further reading, video and photos when available. We have an extensive portfolio of social media platforms through which we share the links to the blog, as well as support the social media efforts of other campus and community arts communications.

Two weeks ago, the Director or Arts Engagement and Community Cultural Affairs for Lehigh University – Silagh White, with the blessing of the University Communications office made a video to support the “Our Lehigh” welcome campaign for our next president, John Simon. The content of the video was a quick tour of the arts venues in South Bethlehem – which all have Lehigh University connections. The response to the video was mostly positive. The feedback was enough to realize that there is so much art to cover, that maybe a weekly video to support the arts would help extend the reach and add more fun to the mix of communication efforts.

To celebrate the 300th post on the arts@lehigh blog, we share a big announcement.

Here’s a little behind the scenes revelation for our readers. For the last year, all of the arts@Lehigh communications have been coming from a one-person production effort. Of course, some of the information for the newsletter comes from helpful people who share information for their programs. There was a preferred anonymity behind the collected “we”.

So. This one-person communications team for the arts@Lehigh is revealing herself because she’s about to put her face on more videos. The videos will be rough, but will hopefully improve with each edition. Maybe she’s going to start writing in the first person. Maybe.

Curtis Stigers – TONIGHT at 7 PM

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Curtis Stigers, the voice behind the Sons of Anarchy theme song, performs at Zoellner Arts Center tonight at 7:00 PM.

Following a two-month European tour

“Rock ‘n’ roll and jazz share so many of the same artistic bloodlines that it’s remarkable the two don’t fuse more often into the kind of inspired marriage of visceral clout and intellectual savvy conjured by the singer, songwriter and saxophonist Curtis Stigers.” – The New York Times

Tickets are $35/25 and available here.

In conjunction with the concert, there will be a free pre-show lobby performance Doug Hawkat 6pm with Doug Hawk, the Lehigh Valley’s own funk/jazz/R&B artist fills the role of vocalist, keyboardist and principal composer in his myriad of groups. He presents a unique style, which can be described as historically soulful yet progressively hip.

 

Hooray-For-Love-YouTube-150x84Given his string of hit singles, millions of records sold and a 23-year recording career that has touched every continent and nearly every genre, one might expect Curtis Stigers to be very busy. The energetic singer/songwriter/saxophonist regularly barnstorms concert halls, festivals and clubs everywhere from Moscow to Manhattan, accompanied one night by his quartet, another by big band or orchestra. He has released new work nearly every year since he started recording, frequently collaborating with his musical heroes. Along the way, this musician who began his career playing standards in a Boise hotel lobby while moonlighting as drummer in a punk rock band has redefined the constitution of contemporary jazz.

Stigers’ repertoire is not so much eclectic as it is a reflection of his appreciation for the fundaments of tone and craft, for quality. (He credits his mentor, the late soul jazz pianist Gene Harris, for his first lessons in the art.) Though much has been made of Stigers’ perceived transformation from pop to jazz artist, in retrospect the progression of his work seems both organic and practical. “Pop used to be jazz. Jazz has always been about reinvention,” Stigers notes.

Throughout, Stigers makes it all look easy. “Hooray For Love [his latest CD] is the embodiment of what happens when everything works,” raves Critical Jazz. “Nothing short of amazing.”

Perhaps because he has penned so many notable songs himself, as well as writing with the likes of Carole King and Barry Mann, Stigers has come to recognize the small, perfect things that are a great melody and lyric, and how to capture them on paper and on tape. But it is his rich singing voice — singular, balletic, at turns mournful and playful — that has landed him on records with the likes of Al Green and Shawn Colvin, in studios with venerated producers like Larry Klein, Danny Kortchmar, and Glen Ballard, and onstage with a plethora of legends, including pop and rock greats Eric Clapton, Elton John, Bonnie Raitt, Rod Stewart, and The Allman Brothers, and jazz giants Nancy Wilson, Al Jarreau, Gerry Mulligan, Randy and Michael Brecker, Chuck Mangione, Toots Thielmans, Wynton Marsalis, Diana Krall, and many more. The voice, of course, is the thing: hearing Stigers’ confident, nuanced delivery is akin to seeing a celebrated actor lose himself in a role.

That talent was recognized early on by music business impresario Clive Davis, who signed Stigers to a record deal after seeing him in a New York dive. A debut album sold over 1.5 million copies worldwide on the strength of self-penned hit singles like “I Wonder Why,” “You’re All That Matters to Me,” and “Never Saw a Miracle.” A year later, Stigers contributed a cover version of Nick Lowe’s “(What’s So Funny ‘Bout) Peace Love and Understanding” to The Bodyguard Soundtrack, which sold over 40 million copies worldwide. Multiple appearances on The Tonight Show, David Letterman, The Today Show, and countless international TV shows, put Stigers directly in the spotlight of popular culture.

More accolades followed. Stigers’ 2003 release You Inspire Me was The Sunday Times (UK) Jazz Album of the Year; in 2007 BBC Radio 2 awarded him Jazz Artist of the Year. In 2010 and 2013, Deutsche Phono-Akademie named Stigers International Male Jazz Singer of the Year at the Jazz Echo Awards; he received an Emmy nomination for “This Life,” a song he co-wrote and sang for the popular television show Sons of Anarchy. Stigers also recently recorded a duet of Cole Porter’s classic “Well Did You Evah” with Family Guy creator/actor/producer Seth MacFarlane and the John Wilson Orchestra, and he made a cameo appearance in MacFarlane’s movie Ted.

But Stigers seems to be the rare artist who has not allowed his success to influence his artistry, or his sense of self. Born in Hollywood, raised in Boise, and transplanted to Manhattan, he now resides, between gigs, in his hometown back in Idaho, a place where he says he can can raise his daughter and “live a real life.” Here, between blue mountains and green fields, Stigers is able to write and discover the songs he wants to sing.

Here’s a bit of Curtis… come swoon with us at Zoellner tonight.

 

Linda Ganus Albulescu – Art Show in Easton

Most of us in the Music Department know Linda as the superhero of ensembles. In her utility belt, she deftly serves as ensemble program coordinator, designs graphics for concert promotions, coordinates instrumental scholarships, assists the orchestra, and plays flute. In her spare time (yes, she finds it), she’s a visual artist. Her work is exhibiting now in Easton, PA at the Nurture Nature Center; 519 Northampton Street. The center is open to the public on Saturdays and Wednesdays from 10:00am-1:00pm, and Thursdays from 6:00pm-9:00pm.

Don’t miss this chance to see Linda’s work.

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American Repertory Ballet – A Midsummer Night’s Dream comes to Lehigh Friday, March 6

The next Zoellner Guest Artist is a welcome respite from the droll winter weather. The American Repertory Ballet Company will present “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” accompanied by the music of Felix Mendelssohn. This is a new production by the New Jersey company this season. Artistic Director Douglas Martin has envisioned the work to focus on the characters; their stories with balance to the attention typically paid to the “dream.”

“The traditional ballet A Midsummer Night’s Dream, most famously, Sir Frederick Ashton’s production, is performed in one act to Mendelssohn’s score “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,'” Martin explains. “My new version of the ballet will be in two acts. Act II is set to Mendelssohn’s score for the ballet, and the Act I is set to music from his First Symphony.  I wanted to make a version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream that offered something new, but still choreographed in a very classical ballet vocabulary,” Martin explains. “In the studio, we’ve been working on creating very strong characters – both among the Athenians and the fairies. I love the worlds we have created, and look forward to sharing them with the public.”

Douglas Martin will also present a pre-performance lecture at 6:30pm.

The performance will be this Friday, March 6 at 7:30pm. Tickets are available at this link.

 

Horger Scholarship Awards announcement

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The faculty of the Department of Art, Architecture and Design recently awarded four Horger* Scholarships for outstanding performance in AAD.  AAD faculty established the following criteria for the Horger award in Art, Architecture and Design.

  • Awarded for dedication and excellence in studio art, architecture, design and art history
  • Recipients are faculty-nominated and faculty-awarded
  • Overall GPA was taken into consideration but was not a final determining factor

Heartiest Congratulations To:

Jaclyn Sands – Studio Art
Evan Orf – Architecture
Liz Phillips – Design
Lindsay Alexander – Art History

*  Theodore U. Horger (known as Ted) was truly a renaissance man. His grounding was in the sciences, having received his Bachelor of Science degree in engineering mechanics from Lehigh in 1961, a Masters in the same major from New York University in 1963, and after working at Bell Labs, the research arm of AT&T, followed by a two year stint in the Peace Corps in Chile, he had a life-long career with AT&T utilizing his engineering education and skills.  Notwithstanding his educational and work background in engineering, he was devoted to the arts in all of its forms—music, theatre, dance and visual arts.

Throughout his lifetime, Ted pursued his interests in performing and visual arts endeavors. Despite living in central NJ, Ted traveled regularly & was a “frequent flier” at Zoellner Arts Center since 1997, attending theatre and music productions as well as guest artists events, exhibition openings and gallery lectures.   During his retirement, he enrolled in classes at MoMA and NYU, further advancing his knowledge & passion for the arts.

The establishment of two permanent endowment funds from his estate: the Theodore U. Horger ’61 Visual & Performing Arts Scholarship Fund and the Theodore U. Horger ’61 Artist-in-Residence Fund in the Performing & Visual Arts is a most fitting and perpetual memorial of Ted’s love for Lehigh and the visual and performing arts.

Bill Warfield and the International Core-tet

Core-tetBill Warfield and the International Core­-tet
The International Core-tet is a group of jazz artists that have come together to facilitate and explore the bond that exists between musicians from many different countries. The group is made up of trumpeter Bill Warfield and saxophonist Glenn Cashman from the U.S., saxophonist Jens “Chappe” Jensen from Denmark and from the Czech Republic, guitarist Libor Smoldas and keyboardist Jakub Zomer. Bill and Jakub met each other in the summer of 2012, while they were working together in Graz, Austria. An invitation by Jakub led Bill to Prague a few weeks later where he met Libor Smoldas. The three worked together for a week and found a real “magic” in the music they played. Between gigs and sets they discussed the idea of forming a core group to continue the transcendent experience they had that week. They made plans to travel together, bringing their mutual love of the music to other countries, including musicians from wherever they went to complete the group. Bill and Jens “Chappe” Jensen met when international saxophone icon Dave Liebman performed a show in Arhus, Denmark, entitled “Le Jazz Hot”, composed, arranged and conducted by Bill. Chappe had arranged Lieb’s appearance.While rehearsing the Kluver’s Jazz Orchestra of which “Chappe” was a member, Bill and he made plans for Bill’s to return following year to compose and conduct a show specifically written for the Danish group.

That was the beginning of their collaborations.
With the inclusion of Jens, the group now represented three European countries and will be performing as the Coretet in the US in the winter of 2015. Joining them for that tour will be three mainstays of the New York Jazz scene: tenor saxophonist Glenn Cashman, bassist Steve Count and percussionist Scott Neumann. Their first recording will be on the Planet ArtsNetwork at the end of the winter tour. The group will continue touring in Europe in the spring and summer 2015.

The International Core-tet performs compositions born of the genres of funk, contemporary and Latin Jazz while embracing the varied
backgrounds and experiences of its members. Audiences are treated to high-powered contemporary music that communicates, transcends and
inspires. We are excited to be embarking on this journey and hope that you will join us in the coming year and to many unspecified dates in the
future.

Bill Warfield and the International Core-tet will perform at the Zoellner Arts Center this Saturday at 8:00 PM. Click here for tickets.

Trashion Show (not a typo)

The Lehigh Eco-Reps are hosting a great event this week that focuses on waste diversion and sustainability. Join them for a fun night of sustainable fashion. Check out creative outfits made from recyclable materials, watch a runway show, and enjoy dessert.
 
Eco-Reps’ 3rd annual Trashion Show is on Thursday Feb. 26 at 7pm in the STEPS concourse!  
 
They  are also looking for designers to showcase creative outfits made out of items normally considered to be trash. All participants will receive a $10 Saxby’s gift card when they sign up their outfit!  For more information about this event and to sign up: http://bit.ly/1Fos9qC    
EcoReps Trashion Show